The myth of continents. The myth of continents : a critique of metageography (eBook, 1997) [paintbottle.com] 2019-01-08

The myth of continents Rating: 6,7/10 1010 reviews

The Myth of Continents: A Critique of Metageography on JSTOR

the myth of continents

Lewis and historian Karen Wigen reexamine the basic geographical divisions we take for granted, and challenge the unconscious spatial frameworks that govern the way we perceive the world. Believed to be built by apes for the Hindu god Rama, this is a series of limestone shoals between India and Srilanka. Wigen is Associate Professor of History, Duke University, and author of The Making of a Japanese Periphery, 1750-1920 California, 1995. Subsequent changes in Japanese global conceptualization closely followed those of Europe--with the signal difference that Asia almost always ranked as the first continent. This extremely readable and thought-provoking analysis also explores the ways that new economic regions, the end of the cold war, and the proliferation of communication technologies change our understanding of the world. The continuing salience of East and West as foundational concepts in our understanding of the world is manifest daily in the popular press, where a cluster of related mental attributes is consistently identified with the European approach to life and contrasted with an opposite set of traits that is said to characterize the East. The difficulty was that no convenient barrier like the Red Sea presented itself between Europe and Asia.

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The Myth of Continents: A Critique of Metageography on JSTOR

the myth of continents

A fantastic book for changing the way you think about geography. Although this is what how continents are defined, we know this is not always true. Nor is such pedagogy aimed strictly at the young. Turkish conquests at its southeastern edge were causing the remaining Christian communities in Asia Minor to retreat, while Christian conquests and conversions in the northeast were vanquishing the last holdouts of paganism in the Baltic region. Lewis is Associate Research Professor of Geography, Duke University, and author of Wagering the Land: Ritual, Capital, and Environmental Degradation in the Cordillera of Northern Luzon, 1900-1986 California, 1992 and Green Delusions: An Environmentalist Critique of Radical Environmentalism 1994. When examining creation stories and creation myths across cultures, there are several obvious similarities and differences that exist.

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9780520207431: The Myth of Continents: A Critique of Metageography

the myth of continents

So, the way to my academic-heart is to name-drop Edward Said a few times. Readers of The Myth of Continents will never again see the world regions in quite the same way. If nothing else this book will make us all a little more aware of how we define ourselves and others. The Myth of Continents sheds new light on how our metageographical assumptions grew out of cultural concepts: how the first continental divisions developed from classical times; how the Urals became the division between the so-called continents of Europe and Asia; how countries like Pakistan and Afghanistan recently shifted macroregions in the general consciousness. The authors claim that the problems dealt with in the book are of momentous importance; that many of these problems have not been tackled or even noticed by other scholars; and that the way the problems are analyzed in this book is radical and unorthodox. In another formulation, Europe was held to include the mainland of Greece, but not the islands or the Peloponnesus.

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The myth of continents : a critique of metageography (Book, 1997) [paintbottle.com]

the myth of continents

One of the strengths of this book is how it shows these artificial views emerging, changing, and adjusting to the dynamism and power of cultures. Here Eurocentrism yields pride of place to Britanocentrism, suggesting the emergence of a new virtual continent in the north Atlantic. But I'd love to read a bit more on the differences between Ibero-America and Africa America, or more on Southwest Asia and why they think the Balkans like usual are so god damned difficult to fit into one mapping scheme or another. Indeed, perspicacious geographers have always been troubled by this division. Their up-to-the-minute study reflects both on the global scale and its relation to the specific continents of Europe, Asia, and Africa-actually part of one contiguous landmass. Interestingly enough, the answer he came up with conformed almost precisely to the conventional list: North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Oceania Australia plus New Zealand , Africa, and Antarctica. The identification of sub-Saharan Africa with the African continent as a whole can be misleading.

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The Myth of Continents

the myth of continents

Even worse, the attempt to redraw regions toward the end of the book do not serve to create a better, or even reasonable, redistribution of boundaries, but serve better to show just how absurd regionalisms generally are. Most insidious in the long run is the way in which this metageographical framework perpetuates a covert form of environmental determinism…the belief that social and cultural differences between human groups can ultimately be traced to differences in their physical environments. A land to the north in Greek mythology. So, the way to my academic-heart is to name-drop Edward Said a few times. Spanish: Silver Mountains , was a legendary treasury of silver that was believed to be located in South America. If continents were to be meaningful geographical divisions of human geography, rather than mere reflections of an ordained cosmic plan, the Nile and the Don obviously formed inappropriate boundaries. In highlighting the Ural divide, Russian Westernizers could at once emphasize the European nature of the historical Russian core while consigning Siberia to the position of an alien Asian realm suitable for colonial rule and exploitation.

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The Myth of Continents : A Critique of Metageography by Kären Wigen and Martin W. Lewis (1997, Paperback)

the myth of continents

Also referred to as Adam's bridge. This was some good shit. Lewis and historian Karen Wigen re-examine the basic geographical divisions we take for granted. This water passage became the core of a continental system when the earliest Greek philosophers, the Ionians of Miletus, designated it as the boundary between the two great landmasses of their world. It is, in fact, a very colonialist view of the continent, and I finished that particular chapter with a new understanding of how alternatives can some times be the same problem masquerading as something else.


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The myth of continents : a critique of metageography (Book, 1997) [paintbottle.com]

the myth of continents

. Very solid endnotes, too, if that's your sort of thing. Medieval Europe thus inherited the geographical ideas of the classical world, but in a calcified and increasingly mythologized form. Von Strahlenberg's proposal was enthusiastically seconded by Russian intellectuals associated with Peter the Great's Westernization program, particularly Vasilii Nikitich Tatishchev, in large part because of its ideological convenience. How did we come to be here? It stimulates thinking about the role of large-scale spatial constructs as driving forces behind particular worldviews and encourages everyone to take a more thoughtful, geographically informed approach to the task of describing and interpreting the human diversity of the planet. Conflating continents with races, he viewed Europe as the land of white people, Africa that of black people, Asia of yellow people, and America of red people--a pernicious notion that still lingers in the public imagination. Addressing concerns over strategies behind regionalisms and area studies, from traditions of orientalism to geo-political interests.

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Project MUSE

the myth of continents

An obvious example would be the extremely arbitrary separation of the European and Asian continents. Cold underworld in Norse mythology. But at the end of the day, I. In eighteenth- and nineteenth-century world atlases, which generally printed the world's major units in different colored inks, one can find fourfold, fivefold, and sixfold divisional schemes. Even worse, the attempt to redraw regions toward the end of the book do not serve to create a better, or even reasonable, redistribution of boundaries, but serve better to show just how ab This book raises an important concern about how we draw regions for the purposes of area studies.


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The myth of continents : a critique of metageography (eBook, 1997) [paintbottle.com]

the myth of continents

Standard mail can take up to 3 weeks to arrive due to post office delivery schedules. With the revival of Greek and Roman learning in the Renaissance, the older continental scheme was revived as well, becoming endowed with an unprecedented scientific authority. The world is divided as follows: East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, Central Asia subdivided into Islamic and Lamaist zones , Southwest Asia and North Africa commonly termed the Middle East , sub-Saharan Africa with an Ethiopian subdivision , Ibero America commonly termed South America , African America, North America, Western and Central Europe, Russia-Southeast Europe and the Caucasus, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesa, and Micronesia and Polynesia. On the other hand, humanist scholars began to search for a secular self-designation. Montesquieu, the foremost geographical thinker of the French Enlightenment, based his social theories on the absolute geographical separation of Europe from Asia, the core of his fourfold continental scheme. Most of Africa is a desert region. In Greek mythology, the sacred garden of Hera from where the gods got their immortality.


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The Myth of Continents: A Critique of Metageography by Martin W. Lewis

the myth of continents

Conflating continents with races, he viewed Europe as the land of white people, Africa that of black people, Asia of yellow people, and America of red people--a pernicious notion that still lingers in the public imagination. This was considered an unsolved geographical issue, however, and geographers vied with each other to locate the most fitting divisional line. Yet minor disagreements persisted as to the exact number of units one should count. Myths are ancient narratives that attempt to answer the enduring and fundamental human questions: How did the universe and the world come to be? So, the way to my academic-heart is to name-drop Edward Said a few times. By the middle of the nineteenth century, Australia was usually portrayed as a distinct part of the world, albeit often linked with the islands of the Pacific.

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